It’s baking time

When it comes to Christmas, my thoughts turn immediately to food. But I know that if I make a big tin of fudge or toffee, I’ll inevitably end up eating it all myself. (This is, apparently, a Bad Thing.) So I decided at the weekend that I’d make a selection of sweets and send them to the various members of my family.

I started off with biscotti. This gets baked twice, once as a loaf and for a second time once it’s been sliced into biscuit-sized portions. Mine wasn’t as crunchy as I’d have liked, as the temperature control in the over seems to be playing up, but it wasn’t too bad for my first attempt. Here’s the finished product.

Biscotti

I then moved on to fudge. I’m a big fan of the Roly’s Fudge franchise and buy a big bag of their fudge whenever I’m near their shop in Sidmouth. I’ve never been able to replicate Roly’s fudge at home, though, so was very excited when I found a recipe on the internet purporting to be theirs. Needless to say, it wasn’t. But I did end up with some rather crunchy, chocolately fudge. Here is it.

Chocolate fudge

Eager to get at least one thing right, I turned to one of my old favourites – white chocolate fudge. When you mix sugar, double cream and white chocolate, it’s very difficult to go wrong. And the result is delicious. This is the only fudge recipe where I use liquid glucose, and it gives the mixture a very silky texture. Here it is on the boil.

Making fudge

And here’s the fudge itself. I really should chop it into tinier pieces. My brother-in-law once had three chunks of this at one sitting and was on a sugar high for about a week.

White chocolate fudge

At Natalie’s request, I then tried a Nigella recipe: Hokey Pokey. This is, essentially, honeycomb and is supposed to be extremely easy to make. In fact, if you are able to tell the difference between a pot of bicarbonate of soda (the required ingredient) and baking powder (what I used), it is indeed remarkably straightforward. I noticed my mistake when the mixture (below) still hadn’t set after 24 hours. I tried again the next morning, though, this time with the right ingredients – and it worked a treat. (This time, it set in two minutes.)

Hokey pokey

Next up was sea salt caramel. This recipe is similar to the one for fudge, except that you boil it to a higher temperature. (The temperature goes up as the water evaporates.) It’s much chewier than fudge but not as crunchy as toffee. If you can resist the temptation to chew, it melts really slowly in your mouth. (Not that I ate half of it, or anything.)

Sea salt caramel

Last up was a recipe that I’d tried before but not really been very happy with : Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s vanilla fudge. This time, though, I followed the recipe very carefully and let it stand to cool in all the right places. And the result was divine. Sorry I doubted you, Hugh. Here’s the fudge cooling in the tin, waiting to be sliced into squares.

Vanilla fudge

A very productive afternoon. And immense fun. I hope my family enjoys eating these sweets as much as I enjoyed making them. I’ll have to make some more, now, so that Natalie and I have something for Christmas, too.

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