Marching for science

It’s probably fair to say that I’m a bit of a science nerd. In fact, it’s a little more than that. I think that science is essential to how we develop as a species. It is an ongoing search for truth and understanding. It is how we rise above our own parochial views and engage with the bigger picture of the world around us. So when science comes under attack, I’m not going to just stand idly by. Continue reading

Just asking

The Prime Minister explained yesterday that she will not allow the Scottish people to hold a legally-binding referendum on independence from the United Kingdom. At least, not in the near future. Her rationale was that, until the UK has agreed a Brexit deal with the European Union, the Scottish people would not know what they were voting for or against. Continue reading

It’s not all Brexit, Brexit, Brexit…

A lot of people, me included, have spent the past few days, weeks and months worrying about the impact of our Government’s approach to leaving the European Union on the future of our country and of those we love. We’ve recently been presented with a whole load more to worry about with the election of Donald Trump as President of the United States. And to cap it all, the lovely (if presumably somewhat gloomy) people at the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, with their Doomsday Clock, have decided that we are now one step closer to global catastrophe. Continue reading

A populist explosion

Unless you’ve been particularly unobservant or on an extended spelunking expedition, you’ll have noticed that politics has gone through a bit of a change recently. People whom we would previously have dismissed as loons are attaining political office. The gap between the political establishment and the man or woman in the street has become a chasm. And everything that we thought we knew about electoral maths no longer seems to apply. Continue reading

We should act now to guarantee the rights of EU citizens living in the UK

There are some three million citizens from other EU countries living in the UK. And none of them know what will happen to their rights after Brexit. We need to give them certainty. No matter how complicated things may be. Continue reading

Flat-pack physics

I had the great honour of being invited back to my alma mater at Keele University yesterday evening. Except this time I found myself on the other side of the lectern, speaking to the Keele Physics Centre about how the art of origami is having a profound impact on the way we build things in physics.

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Family

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The RNLI has been a part of my life for as long as I can remember. I come from a seafaring family and my dad taught me to sail on the winding rivers of East Anglia. After a career in the merchant navy, he found his way into the RNLI as a training officer. And he was smitten. He loved being out on the water and was soon responsible for all of the lifeboat stations on the east coast of England, from Berwick-upon-Tweed down to Rye Harbour. Continue reading

Oh. Erm, well…

It was another of those ‘Brexit’ moments. I checked the online news this morning and assumed I must be reading it wrong. So I read it again. And again. But the news remained the same. Donald Trump has been elected 45th President of the United States. And depending on whom you believe, it’s either the dawn of a new political era or the end of days. Personally, I’m guessing it’ll be somewhere in the middle. Continue reading

This explains everything (or, at the very least, quite a lot)

I had an interesting conversation with my mother last night. That in itself is not, I hasten to add, sufficient reason to devote a blog post to it. But the topic of the conversation is, because it explains quite a lot about how our country has got itself into such a pickle about the European Union. Continue reading